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Tag Archives: censorship

RIP

“I did not know how to write lyrics and melodies until I was put behind bars. It is there that I learned,” he said in 2017.

Update: Haacaaluu Hundeessa: The protest singer who became an Oromo icon
https://aje.io/kxdpm

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-53233531

He released his first album Sanyii Mootii (Race of the King) in 2009, a year after walking free, and it turned him into a music star, and a political symbol of the Oromo people’s aspirations.

After a long appeal process the twelve members of  La Insurgencia Spanish rap group have been give 6 months prison!

The Supreme Court has ratified the sentence of 6 months and one day in prison for the 12 members of the rap group La Insurgencia for a crime of exalting terrorism for praising GRAPO and its members in their songs on the Internet.Initially, the National Court imposed a sentence of 2 years and 1 day in prison, but by appealing to its Appeals Chamber, it reduced the sentence to 6 months and 1 day because the terrorist organization they praised, the GRAPO, is already inactive, a doctrine that has been applied on several occasions in cases of exaltation of ETA.”

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-50672876

“After the 1994 exhibition, the Glasgow-based artist was disappointed at the war museum’s decision to select just six of the less brutal paintings for its permanent collection.”

David Bowie, however, did buy the most brutal painting of a rape.

He was unprepared for an experience of war and after his war artist experience in 1993 in Bosnia he had a lot of mental problems. PTSD, but maybe on top of earlier stuff. At the age of 6 his first painting was of the crucifixion.

https://peterhowson.co.uk/peter-howson-on-art-and-politics/

PH: “Art was always political, it’s only recently that it’s become very vapid. I always separate the art from the person. I don’t rate new Scottish art at all, a lot of it looks like advertising. Real art is Otto Dix, George Grosz, Goya, Michelangelo and Ken Currie here is the only artist doing serious stuff at the moment, and when I say serious I mean social commentary – art has got to speak to people, it’s got to communicate.”

Once we stayed in Edinburgh in a room with one of his earlier paintings on the wall – it didn’t contribute to a homely feel!

Howson in room

 

 

 

Sentenced to a year in prison for insulting the police in this video. This is the fate of the Moroccan rapper Gnawi. I’m looking for an English translation for the Lyrics.

“Young people make up a third of Morocco’s 35 million inhabitants. A quarter of those aged between 15 and 24 are unemployed and out of school, according to official figures.”

I have to admire the guts of this guy – Mr.Guti . Apparently Basra is run by gangs and it is somewhere you can be in danger if you espouse western modernist forms in public. I saw a programme on Youtube influencers in Iraq the other night. One has been killed and another, in Bagdad, was running a legal  battle against people threatening her (which she was winning!) and had to live almost in isolation with her daughter. These people are fighting for basic freedom of expression which we take for granted. This was in Baghdad which is reckoned to be generally much safer to live an and more stable than Basra.

The video above start in Arabic and then about half way there is an version in English. The lyrics area protest a bout the desperate poverty of the mass of people…

For more see:

http://www.studentnewspaper.org/iraqi-influencers-are-risking-their-lives-to-fight-for-womens-rights/

Abdurehim Heyit

May his music not be forgotten!!!!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdurehim_Heyit

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-43407694

César Strawberry rapper get two year prison sentence for lyrics (suspended).

  • “”In December, 12 members of the rap group Insurgencia each received two-year jail terms, for glorifying terrorism in one of their songs

  • In February, the Supreme Court confirmed a three-and-a-half year jail term for Mallorcan rapper Valtònyc for glorifying terrorism and insulting the monarchy in his lyrics

  • Earlier this month, Catalan rapper Pablo Hasél also received a two-year sentence and a fine of 37,800 euros (£33,500; $46,700) on similar charges

Please follow these people on Twitter for updates.

Meanwhile in Turkey and elsewhere”

http://voiceproject.org/campaign/imprisoned-artists/

Back in Blightly Transpontine reminds me that the anti-rave Criminal Justice Act from 1994 is still in effect …

https://history-is-made-at-night.blogspot.co.uk

 

 

This seems like a good way of packaging Agit Disco songs that does not challenge the everyday exclusion of political material that Agit Disco was attempting to highlight. What it does do is an international selection of banned songs close to the heart of the British Index on Censorship.

Having had that gripe it sounds like a good project and very well designed and presented. It seems like they took the considerable trouble to go and meet the original musicians to photograph them and find out about the songs and it this research that makes the project impressive.

On their website they say: “WHAT MAKES A SONG BANNED? Through history, thousands of musicians have faced censorship, persecution and violent suppression. Often, their stories remain untold. Who were they? Who are they? And what can we learn from their stories?

In this project, photographer Jørgen Nordby and musician Pål Moddi Knutsen set out to trace the footsteps of songs that have, at one stage, been banned, censored or silenced. In countries as far apart as Mexico and Vietnam, we met musicians who have little in common except their tireless struggle for the right to sing.”

So you can buy the album and listen to the songs as well as read the story of the originals on the websiteunsongs_cover. Moddi seems like an accomplished musician and is soon to be presenting the songs played by himself in London.

 

 

Clear lyrical power and a graphic use of recent footage of Libyan struggle in video. This Thing ain’t going away without a howl of protest from around the world.

Khaled M. hails from Libya but grew up in Lexington, Kentucky, USA. Lowkey is from the UK with Iraqi parentage.

Another UK based Libyan is Ibn Thabit. Lots of free/donation only downloads here:

http://ibnthabit.net/site/

Useful concise history of Libyan music here:

http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/1688/1/?newsmaker=99&redirectURL=http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsmaker/giving-beast